Fitness

Getting Match Ready: Coordination exercises

coordination

When it comes to physical coordination the only definition that can only be told is with the inclusion of motor skills. The reason I wrote it this way is that motor skills are developed in you when you were a kid when new neural connections were made, and you were learning to walk, crawl, or talk. So what good is it for adults?

Motor skills are already developed, but the conditioning of coordination never stops, and coordination improves with recreational activities.

For example, we all know how to cut paper with scissors, but when we have to cut along a straight line, it takes us a little time, that little time is actually the time our body took to condition its coordination (Hand to the eye).

Balance, rhythm, spatial orientation and the ability to react to both auditory and visual stimulus have all been identified as elements of coordination. In fact, the development of good coordination is a multi-tiered sequence that progresses from skills performed with good spatial awareness but without speed to skills performed at increased speeds and in a constantly changing environment.

Using coordination exercises can really help your sports performance and keep you better balanced throughout the day.

Coordination is made of seven elements:  

  1. Balance (both static and dynamic)
  2. Rhythm
  3. Spatial orientation
  4. Speed of reaction (to sights and sounds)
  5. Synchronisation of movement
  6. Kinaesthetic differentiation
  7. Movement adequacy

These elements are interconnected to each other, but these can be improved almost individually with certain drills.

  • BALANCE

SEE- Balance exercises (importance & examples)

 

  • SENSE OF RHYTHM
    • Rope skipping
    • Sprinting over a short distance.
    • Try to make your static exercises as dynamic ones (e.g.- Lunges to jumping lunges, squats to tuck jump squats, etc.)
    • Box jump.
    • Running with high knees

 

 

  • SPATIAL ORIENTATION
  1. Stepping over and under a line of high hurdles
  2. Crawling under and Jumping over a line of hurdles
  3. From an athletic stance attempt, 90-180-360 degree hips turns, jumps and landings
  4. In a bear crawl position, move side to side on the command of the coach
  5. In a bear crawl position, butt roll left or right back to bear crawl position on command of the coach

 

  • SPEED OF REACTION
  1. Coach throws a ball standing behind the athlete when the ball comes into view the athlete sprints for the ball
  2. With the coach standing behind the athlete, the coach throws a ball forward off of a wall, athlete reacts by stopping, trapping or catching the ball after it bounces off the wall
  3. In a small space, the athlete uses a shuffle, crossover or sprint technique as the coach either points (visual) or yells (auditory) to move left or right

 

  • SYNCHRONIZATION OF MOVEMENT

  1. Swing arms and clap hands together while skipping at the same time
  2. Run with high knee while making circles with one arm
  3. Jump up and down while tapping the belly with one hand and rubbing the head with the other hand
  4. Run backwards while alternately making arms circles forward
  • KINAESTHETIC DIFFERENTIATION

The ability to discern and finely adjust the muscular tension in the movement to achieve the desired result.

  1. Throw a medicine ball to various targets both near and far away
  2. Throw medicine balls of various weights to the same target
  3. Throw medicine balls of various weights to multiple targets both near and far
  4. On the field accelerate sprinting to full speed for twenty yards, then try to continue running but slightly slow to a relaxed run for twenty yards, then reaccelerate again. Sprint-float-sprint
  5. On the field, alternate periods of sprinting and hard running
  6. On the field sprint twenty yards while holding a medicine ball, then sprint twenty yards without

 

  • MOVEMENT ADEQUACY

The ability to move in such a way as to accomplish a task with minimal effort. This is essentially the summation of all the above elements.

  1. Set up an obstacle course that combines elements of balance, speed, strength, synchronisation, spatial orientation, etc.

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