Monday, October 3, 2022

FIFA still striving to retrieve its image, Transparency International says

FIFA is still in struggle to retrieve trust from fans, as inferred from a survey conducted by Transparency International, a global organisation fighting corruption worldwide, in collaboration with Swedish based Forza football.

In the survey of 25,000 participants across 50 countries, fifty-three percent revealed themselves to be bearing no faith in FIFA.

The figure has evinced an improvement from sixty-nine last year but that time it was an expected because of the more than a dozen officials that were charged of embezzlement about two years ago.

Transparency head Cobus de Swardt spoke on the gravity of the situation.

 

For any organisation that relies so much on the fans — without the fans football is dead, it’s commercially dead, its passion is dead — that is a rather serious situation.”

 

“We don’t underestimate the toughness of the job, but in that sense so far the news has been only moderately good.”

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As concerns of wading out of this corruption is taken, just thirty four percent believe that FIFA is actively fighting against corruption. Sixty-six percent are worried about the corruption in match-fixing.

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For the upcoming World Cup to be hosted by Russia in 2018, only thirty-nine percent have approved. Forty-three percent do not want it to happen in a nation tangling with with LGBT rights and racism in the game.

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Though Gianni Infantino, the FIFA president has declared to have come up as more open and, accountable with the measures it took, it scarcely cast a positive impact on the fans. De Swardt says, “FIFA puts out 50-page brochures talking of reform, but to the average fan, when I talk to them about what has changed in FIFA, they shake their heads. They have no idea what has really changed.”

Infantino who succeeded the post of president after disgraced Sepp Blatter is struggling to restore the damaged reputation of FIFA
Infantino, who succeeded the post of president after disgraced Sepp Blatter, is struggling to restore the damaged reputation of FIFA

Infantino’s replacement with Blatter was immediately followed by revision in projected revenue for the 2015-2018 cycle upwards from $5 billion to $5.65 billion, with projected investments amounting to $5.55 billion, FIFA had declared. But de Swardt argues,

“For the average fan, the problem is not that there is too little money in football, but there is too much, and fans see this in what they have to pay for tickets, merchandise, etc.”

 

As another adverse consequence of all this, FIFA is striving to have a fair sponsership. It has got just one top-tier partner, China’s Wanda group signed under Infantino. Alfa bank of Russia has negotiated as regional sponser.

De Swardt comments,

“FIFA hasn’t been really rebuilt to the extent where sponsors are falling over their feet to be associated with the FIFA name. I’ve had sponsors telling me that they would love to be associated with football but not with FIFA.”

 

FIFA is still in struggle to retrieve trust from fans, as inferred from a survey conducted by Transparency International, a global organisation fighting corruption worldwide, in collaboration with Swedish based Forza football.

In the survey of 25,000 participants across 50 countries, fifty-three percent revealed themselves to be bearing no faith in FIFA.

The figure has evinced an improvement from sixty-nine last year but that time it was an expected because of the more than a dozen officials that were charged of embezzlement about two years ago.

Transparency head Cobus de Swardt spoke on the gravity of the situation.

 

For any organisation that relies so much on the fans — without the fans football is dead, it’s commercially dead, its passion is dead — that is a rather serious situation.”

 

“We don’t underestimate the toughness of the job, but in that sense so far the news has been only moderately good.”

 

As concerns of wading out of this corruption is taken, just thirty four percent believe that FIFA is actively fighting against corruption. Sixty-six percent are worried about the corruption in match-fixing.

For the upcoming World Cup to be hosted by Russia in 2018, only thirty-nine percent have approved. Forty-three percent do not want it to happen in a nation tangling with with LGBT rights and racism in the game.

Though Gianni Infantino, the FIFA president has declared to have come up as more open and, accountable with the measures it took, it scarcely cast a positive impact on the fans. De Swardt says, “FIFA puts out 50-page brochures talking of reform, but to the average fan, when I talk to them about what has changed in FIFA, they shake their heads. They have no idea what has really changed.”

Infantino who succeeded the post of president after disgraced Sepp Blatter is struggling to restore the damaged reputation of FIFA
Infantino, who succeeded the post of president after disgraced Sepp Blatter, is struggling to restore the damaged reputation of FIFA

Infantino’s replacement with Blatter was immediately followed by revision in projected revenue for the 2015-2018 cycle upwards from $5 billion to $5.65 billion, with projected investments amounting to $5.55 billion, FIFA had declared. But de Swardt argues,

“For the average fan, the problem is not that there is too little money in football, but there is too much, and fans see this in what they have to pay for tickets, merchandise, etc.”

 

As another adverse consequence of all this, FIFA is striving to have a fair sponsership. It has got just one top-tier partner, China’s Wanda group signed under Infantino. Alfa bank of Russia has negotiated as regional sponser.

De Swardt comments,

“FIFA hasn’t been really rebuilt to the extent where sponsors are falling over their feet to be associated with the FIFA name. I’ve had sponsors telling me that they would love to be associated with football but not with FIFA.”

 

FIFA is still in struggle to retrieve trust from fans, as inferred from a survey conducted by Transparency International, a global organisation fighting corruption worldwide, in collaboration with Swedish based Forza football.

In the survey of 25,000 participants across 50 countries, fifty-three percent revealed themselves to be bearing no faith in FIFA.

The figure has evinced an improvement from sixty-nine last year but that time it was an expected because of the more than a dozen officials that were charged of embezzlement about two years ago.

Transparency head Cobus de Swardt spoke on the gravity of the situation.

 

For any organisation that relies so much on the fans — without the fans football is dead, it’s commercially dead, its passion is dead — that is a rather serious situation.”

 

“We don’t underestimate the toughness of the job, but in that sense so far the news has been only moderately good.”

 

As concerns of wading out of this corruption is taken, just thirty four percent believe that FIFA is actively fighting against corruption. Sixty-six percent are worried about the corruption in match-fixing.

For the upcoming World Cup to be hosted by Russia in 2018, only thirty-nine percent have approved. Forty-three percent do not want it to happen in a nation tangling with with LGBT rights and racism in the game.

Though Gianni Infantino, the FIFA president has declared to have come up as more open and, accountable with the measures it took, it scarcely cast a positive impact on the fans. De Swardt says, “FIFA puts out 50-page brochures talking of reform, but to the average fan, when I talk to them about what has changed in FIFA, they shake their heads. They have no idea what has really changed.”

Infantino who succeeded the post of president after disgraced Sepp Blatter is struggling to restore the damaged reputation of FIFA
Infantino, who succeeded the post of president after disgraced Sepp Blatter, is struggling to restore the damaged reputation of FIFA

Infantino’s replacement with Blatter was immediately followed by revision in projected revenue for the 2015-2018 cycle upwards from $5 billion to $5.65 billion, with projected investments amounting to $5.55 billion, FIFA had declared. But de Swardt argues,

“For the average fan, the problem is not that there is too little money in football, but there is too much, and fans see this in what they have to pay for tickets, merchandise, etc.”

 

As another adverse consequence of all this, FIFA is striving to have a fair sponsership. It has got just one top-tier partner, China’s Wanda group signed under Infantino. Alfa bank of Russia has negotiated as regional sponser.

De Swardt comments,

“FIFA hasn’t been really rebuilt to the extent where sponsors are falling over their feet to be associated with the FIFA name. I’ve had sponsors telling me that they would love to be associated with football but not with FIFA.”

 

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