Wednesday,December 7,2022

Free weight v/s Body weight : What is calisthenics?

In my personal opinion, calisthenics is a verse proving that one does not need a gym to get a good physique. The argument between body weight training and free weight training is never ending, and I don’t mean to end it right now. Different individual have different opinion. Both training methods only help in maintaining overall body  fitness.

But I believe that calisthenics has upper hand (unless you want to be a body builder or power lifter), why? Because one doesn’t need to buy loads of stuff, can perform them anywhere, and can have equal (if not better) results.

Your own body is the ultimate instrument you will ever need for shaping and strengthening.


So, what is calisthenics?

Calisthenics are exercises consisting of a variety of gross motor movements; often rhythmical and generally without equipment or apparatus.

They are intended to improve body strength, body flexibility and fitness through the movements that we all learned by the age of two, such as pulling, pushing, bending, or jumping, using one’s own body weight.

When performed vigorously and with variety, calisthenics can provide the benefits of muscular and aerobic conditioning, in addition to improving psychomotor skills such as balance, agility and coordination.

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A study analyzed the affects of calisthenics on obese children. They performed six different calisthenics exercises three times a week and this study showed that over the course of six months the average child dropped from 45% overweight to 25% overweight.

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Common Exercises-

  • Lunges

Performed by bringing one leg forward and almost kneeling on the back leg. Once the front leg creates a perfect 90 degree angle, stand up and alternate legs, keeping the back straight and chest out.

  • Sit-ups

Performed by lying down with the back on the floor, knees bent, and bottoms of feet against the floor. The shoulders are then lifted off the floor by tightening abdominal muscles and bringing the chest closer to the knees. The final movement is to lower the back to the floor with a smooth movement. This trains the abdominal muscles.

  • Crunches

Like the sit-up, except instead of bringing the whole torso area closer to the knees, only a concentrated but shorter movement of the abdominals is performed. Shoulder blades are lifted off the floor, and abdominals tightened.

  • Push-ups

Performed face down on the floor, palms against floor under the shoulders, toes curled upwards against the floor. The arms are used to lift the body while maintaining a straight line from head to heel. The arms of the subject should go from fully extended in the high position to nearly fully flexed in the low position, while the subject makes sure to avoid resting on the floor. Resting is only done in the high position of the exercise. Chest, shoulders, and triceps are trained with this exercise. By furthering the range of motion, what is often called a push up +, by pushing the shoulders downwards at the top the serratus anterior comes further into play.

  • Pull-ups

An overhead bar (sometimes called a chin-up bar) is grasped using a shoulder-width grip. The subject lifts their body up, chin level with the bar, and keeping the back straight throughout. The bar remains in front of the subject at all times. The subject then slowly returns to starting position in a slow controlled manner. This primarily trains the lats or upper back muscles, as well as the forearms. An underhand grip variation or chin-up trains both the back and biceps.

  • Squats

Standing with feet shoulder width apart, the subject squats down as far as possible, bringing the arms forward parallel to the floor. The subject then returns to standing position. Squats train the quadriceps, hamstrings, calves, and gluteals.

  • Calf-raises

Standing on a platform with an edge where the heels can hang (e.g. a curb), lift the body on the balls of the feet. The subject then slowly returns to starting position. This trains the gastrocnemius and to a lesser degree the soleus. A seated calf-raise trains the soleus.

  • Hyperextensions

Performed in a prone position on the ground, the individual raises the legs, arms and upper body off the ground.

 

In my personal opinion, calisthenics is a verse proving that one does not need a gym to get a good physique. The argument between body weight training and free weight training is never ending, and I don’t mean to end it right now. Different individual have different opinion. Both training methods only help in maintaining overall body  fitness.

But I believe that calisthenics has upper hand (unless you want to be a body builder or power lifter), why? Because one doesn’t need to buy loads of stuff, can perform them anywhere, and can have equal (if not better) results.

Your own body is the ultimate instrument you will ever need for shaping and strengthening.


So, what is calisthenics?

Calisthenics are exercises consisting of a variety of gross motor movements; often rhythmical and generally without equipment or apparatus.

They are intended to improve body strength, body flexibility and fitness through the movements that we all learned by the age of two, such as pulling, pushing, bending, or jumping, using one’s own body weight.

When performed vigorously and with variety, calisthenics can provide the benefits of muscular and aerobic conditioning, in addition to improving psychomotor skills such as balance, agility and coordination.

 

A study analyzed the affects of calisthenics on obese children. They performed six different calisthenics exercises three times a week and this study showed that over the course of six months the average child dropped from 45% overweight to 25% overweight.

 

Common Exercises-

  • Lunges

Performed by bringing one leg forward and almost kneeling on the back leg. Once the front leg creates a perfect 90 degree angle, stand up and alternate legs, keeping the back straight and chest out.

  • Sit-ups

Performed by lying down with the back on the floor, knees bent, and bottoms of feet against the floor. The shoulders are then lifted off the floor by tightening abdominal muscles and bringing the chest closer to the knees. The final movement is to lower the back to the floor with a smooth movement. This trains the abdominal muscles.

  • Crunches

Like the sit-up, except instead of bringing the whole torso area closer to the knees, only a concentrated but shorter movement of the abdominals is performed. Shoulder blades are lifted off the floor, and abdominals tightened.

  • Push-ups

Performed face down on the floor, palms against floor under the shoulders, toes curled upwards against the floor. The arms are used to lift the body while maintaining a straight line from head to heel. The arms of the subject should go from fully extended in the high position to nearly fully flexed in the low position, while the subject makes sure to avoid resting on the floor. Resting is only done in the high position of the exercise. Chest, shoulders, and triceps are trained with this exercise. By furthering the range of motion, what is often called a push up +, by pushing the shoulders downwards at the top the serratus anterior comes further into play.

  • Pull-ups

An overhead bar (sometimes called a chin-up bar) is grasped using a shoulder-width grip. The subject lifts their body up, chin level with the bar, and keeping the back straight throughout. The bar remains in front of the subject at all times. The subject then slowly returns to starting position in a slow controlled manner. This primarily trains the lats or upper back muscles, as well as the forearms. An underhand grip variation or chin-up trains both the back and biceps.

  • Squats

Standing with feet shoulder width apart, the subject squats down as far as possible, bringing the arms forward parallel to the floor. The subject then returns to standing position. Squats train the quadriceps, hamstrings, calves, and gluteals.

  • Calf-raises

Standing on a platform with an edge where the heels can hang (e.g. a curb), lift the body on the balls of the feet. The subject then slowly returns to starting position. This trains the gastrocnemius and to a lesser degree the soleus. A seated calf-raise trains the soleus.

  • Hyperextensions

Performed in a prone position on the ground, the individual raises the legs, arms and upper body off the ground.

 

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In my personal opinion, calisthenics is a verse proving that one does not need a gym to get a good physique. The argument between body weight training and free weight training is never ending, and I don’t mean to end it right now. Different individual have different opinion. Both training methods only help in maintaining overall body  fitness.

But I believe that calisthenics has upper hand (unless you want to be a body builder or power lifter), why? Because one doesn’t need to buy loads of stuff, can perform them anywhere, and can have equal (if not better) results.

Your own body is the ultimate instrument you will ever need for shaping and strengthening.


So, what is calisthenics?

Calisthenics are exercises consisting of a variety of gross motor movements; often rhythmical and generally without equipment or apparatus.

They are intended to improve body strength, body flexibility and fitness through the movements that we all learned by the age of two, such as pulling, pushing, bending, or jumping, using one’s own body weight.

When performed vigorously and with variety, calisthenics can provide the benefits of muscular and aerobic conditioning, in addition to improving psychomotor skills such as balance, agility and coordination.

 

A study analyzed the affects of calisthenics on obese children. They performed six different calisthenics exercises three times a week and this study showed that over the course of six months the average child dropped from 45% overweight to 25% overweight.

 

Common Exercises-

  • Lunges

Performed by bringing one leg forward and almost kneeling on the back leg. Once the front leg creates a perfect 90 degree angle, stand up and alternate legs, keeping the back straight and chest out.

  • Sit-ups

Performed by lying down with the back on the floor, knees bent, and bottoms of feet against the floor. The shoulders are then lifted off the floor by tightening abdominal muscles and bringing the chest closer to the knees. The final movement is to lower the back to the floor with a smooth movement. This trains the abdominal muscles.

  • Crunches

Like the sit-up, except instead of bringing the whole torso area closer to the knees, only a concentrated but shorter movement of the abdominals is performed. Shoulder blades are lifted off the floor, and abdominals tightened.

  • Push-ups

Performed face down on the floor, palms against floor under the shoulders, toes curled upwards against the floor. The arms are used to lift the body while maintaining a straight line from head to heel. The arms of the subject should go from fully extended in the high position to nearly fully flexed in the low position, while the subject makes sure to avoid resting on the floor. Resting is only done in the high position of the exercise. Chest, shoulders, and triceps are trained with this exercise. By furthering the range of motion, what is often called a push up +, by pushing the shoulders downwards at the top the serratus anterior comes further into play.

  • Pull-ups

An overhead bar (sometimes called a chin-up bar) is grasped using a shoulder-width grip. The subject lifts their body up, chin level with the bar, and keeping the back straight throughout. The bar remains in front of the subject at all times. The subject then slowly returns to starting position in a slow controlled manner. This primarily trains the lats or upper back muscles, as well as the forearms. An underhand grip variation or chin-up trains both the back and biceps.

  • Squats

Standing with feet shoulder width apart, the subject squats down as far as possible, bringing the arms forward parallel to the floor. The subject then returns to standing position. Squats train the quadriceps, hamstrings, calves, and gluteals.

  • Calf-raises

Standing on a platform with an edge where the heels can hang (e.g. a curb), lift the body on the balls of the feet. The subject then slowly returns to starting position. This trains the gastrocnemius and to a lesser degree the soleus. A seated calf-raise trains the soleus.

  • Hyperextensions

Performed in a prone position on the ground, the individual raises the legs, arms and upper body off the ground.

 

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